Category Archives: Goethe Yearbook

Editor Sought for the Goethe Yearbook

Call to fill the position of editor for the Yearbook of the North American Goethe Society

As the current editors have successfully served their five-year term, the Society is now welcoming applications to fill the position for the next five year term. Joint applications for co-editorship are welcome. The Goethe Society will provide the editors with funds for copy-editing and print preparation of the Yearbook.

For scholars interested in serving as the next editor, please send a letter of application, c.v., and a brief 500-word statement about your scholarly engagement with German literature in the Goethezeit, as well as your vision for the Yearbook, to Daniel Purdy, dlp14@psu.edu, by July 15, 2017.

Goethe Yearbook 24 (2017)

Special Section on The Poetics of Space in the Goethezeit, edited by Elliot Schreiber and John B. Lyon

  1. Elliot Schreiber and John B. Lyon, “Introduction: The Poetics of Space in the Goethezeit.” 3-19.
Articles:
  1. Colin Benert, “The Theater of Anamnesis: The Spaces of Memory and the Exteriority of Time in Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre.” 21-41.
  2. Anthony Mahler, “Affective Enclosures: The Topography and Topoi of Goethe’s Autobiographical Childhood.” 43-63
  3. Tove Holmes, “Blind Spots as Projection Spaces in Die Wahlverwandtschaften. 65-84.
  4. John B. Lyon, “Disorientation in Novalis or ‘The Subterranean Homesick Blues’.” 85-103.
  5. Joseph D. O’Neil, “Selfhood, Sovereignty, and Public Space in Die italienische Reise, “Das Rochus-Fest zu Bingen,” and Dichtung und Wahrheit, Book Five.” 105-124.
  6. Christian P. Weber, “Spatial Mobilization: Kleist’s Strategic Road Map for the Berliner Abendblätter and Tactical Displacements in the ‘Tagesbegebenheiten’.” 125-153.
  7. Monika Nenon, “‘Daseyn enthüllen’: Zum mediengeschichtlichen Kontext von Friedrich Heinrich Jacobis Eduard Allwills Papiere.” 155-174.
  8. Sara Luly, “The Horror of Coming Home: Integration and Fragmentation in Caroline de la Motte Fouqué’s ‘Der Abtrünnige’.” 175-195.
  9. Stephanie Galasso, “Form and Contention: Sati as Custom in Günderrode’s ‘Die Malabarischen Witwen’.” 197-220.
  10. Gabriel Trop, “Absolute Signification and Ontological Inconsistency in E. T. A. Hoffmann’s Der Sandmann.” 221-248.
  11. Edgar Landgraf, “Educational Environments: Narration and Education in Campe, Goethe, and Kleist.” 249-264.
  12. Inge Stephan, “‘War Goethe ein Mohammedaner?’: Goethes West-östlicher Divan (1819) als Spiegelungsfläche in Thomas Lehrs September. Fata Morgana (2010). 265-279.
Book Reviews:
  1. Faust: The First Part of the Tragedy by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (review). Walter K. Stewart. 281-282.
  2. Goethe’s Faust and Cultural Memory: Comparatist Interfaces ed. by Lorna Fitzsimmons (review). Andrew B. B. Hamilton. 283-284.
  3. Lorbeerkranz und Palmenzweig: Streifzüge im Gebiet des poetischen Lobs by Johannes Anderegg (review). Hans Rudolf Vaget. 284-285.
  4. Ungleiche Gleichgesinnte: Die Beziehung zwischen Goethe und Schiller, 1794–98 by Gerrit Brüning (review). Jeffrey L. Sammons. 285-287.
  5. Goethes Freunde in Gotha und Weimar by Sigrid Damm (review). Elizabeth Powers. 287-290.
  6. The Eye and the Gaze: Goethe and the Autobiographical Subject by Evelyn K. Moore (review). Seth Berk. 290-292.
  7. Mehr Licht: Goethe mit Newton im Streit um die Farben by Olaf L. Müller (review). Joel B. Lande. 292-293.
  8. Goethe and Judaism: The Troubled Inheritance of Modern Literature by Karin Schutjer (review). Jonathan M. Hess. 293-295.
  9. Demonic History: From Goethe to the Present by Kirk Wetters (review). Daniel DiMassa. 295-297.
  10. A Translation from German into English of Joseph von Eichendorff’s Romantic Novel Ahnung und Gegenwart (1815) by Joseph von Eichendorff (review). Erlis Glass Wickersham. 297-298.
  11. Die Welt in Bildern: Erfahrungen und Evidenz in Friedrich J. Bertuchs Bilderbuch für Kinder by Silvy Chakkalakal (review). Patricia Anne Simpson. 299-300.
  12. Weibliche Kreativität um 1800: Women’s Creativity around 1800 ed. by Linda Dietrick and Birte Giesler (review). Sara Luly. 301-302.
  13. Novel Affinities: Composing the Family in the German Novel, 1795–1830 by Sarah Vandegrift Eldridge (review). Erlis Glass Wickersham. 302-304.
  14. Autopsie von Revolution und Restauration: Georg Büchner und die politische Imagination by Patrick Fortmann (review). Bernd K. Estabrook. 304-305.
  15. Europäische Romantik: Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven der Forschung ed. by Helmut Hühn and Joachim Schiedermair (review). Marcus Lampert. 305-307.
  16. Bluestocking Feminism and British-German Cultural Transfer, 1750–1837 by Alessa Johns (review). Karin Baumgartner. 307-309.
  17. Forgotten Dreams: Revisiting Romanticism in the Cinema of Werner Herzog by Laurie Ruth Johnson (review). Kamaal Haque. 309-311.
  18. Zeitschriftenliteratur/Fortsetzungsliteratur ed. by Nicola Kaminski, Nora Ramtke, and Carsten Zelle (review). Vance Byrd. 311-313.
  19. Romanticism, Origins, and the History of Heredity by Christine Lehleiter (review). Stefani Engelstein. 313-315.
  20. Fragile Minds and Vulnerable Souls: The Matter of Obscenity in Nineteenth-Century Germany by Sarah L. Leonard (review). Samper Vendrell. 315-317.
  21. E. T. A. Hoffmann, Cosmopolitanism, and the Struggle for German Opera by Francien Markx (review). Christopher R. Clason. 317-319.
  22. The Science of Literature: Essays on an Incalculable Difference by Helmut Müller-Sievers (review). Joseph D. O’Neil. 319-321.
  23. Poetry as a Way of Life: Aesthetics and Askesis in the German Eighteenth Century by Gabriel Trop (review). Christian P. Weber. 321-324.
  24. Transplanting the Metaphysical Organ: German Romanticism between Leibniz and Marx by Leif Weatherby (review). Alice A. Kuzniar. 324-326.

From the Yearbook Editors

Volume 24 of the Goethe Yearbook is currently in the final stages of typesetting and should be in your mailboxes by late spring. It will contain a special section on the “Poetics of Space and Place in the Goethezeit,” co-edited by Elliott Schreiber and John B. Lyon, as well as standalone articles on Caroline de la Motte Fouqué, on widow-burning in Karoline von Günderrode, on ontology and signification in E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Sandmann, on “Educational Environments in Goethe and Kleist,” on F.H. Jacobi’s Allwill, and on Goethe’s Divan as reflected in Thomas Lehr’s novel September. Fata Morgana (2010). Once again we are very pleased that this volume brings together very diverse scholarship, and that our contributors once again run the gamut from graduate students to emeriti. And our new book review editor Sean Franzel has brought together more than 20 thoughtful reviews of recent publications relevant to the Goethezeit.

We are well on our way towards putting together the twenty-fifth volume of the Yearbook. It will contain a special section on “What Goethe heard,” edited by Mary Helen Dupree. However, it will also contain a large number of standalone articles. As always, we would be thrilled if you submitted a manuscript, or encouraged your students and colleagues to do so. Manuscript submissions should reach us by late May, preferably earlier. Submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style and confine themselves to less than 35 pages. For specific questions about scholarly citations, please consult the Yearbook’s style sheet. Note that the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Finally, Volume 25 will be the last Goethe Yearbook under our auspices. So please give some thought to putting your name forward when the GSNA begins its search for our successors. We have really loved our time shepherding this wonderful journal, and we are quite sure you would too!

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

 

From the Book Review Editor

As always, I encourage you to let me know if there are particular areas of research that you are interested in reviewing for the Goethe Yearbook. Please send books for review and suggestions for books for review to:

Professor Sean Franzel
Department of German and Russian Studies
University of Missouri
428 Strickland Hall
Columbia MO, 65211
Telephone: (573) 882-4328
Fax: (573) 884-8456
franzels@missouri.edu

From the Yearbook Editors

Vol. 24 of the Goethe Yearbook is currently being copy-edited and will be on its way to the printer soon. This volume will feature a special section co-edited by John Lyon and Elliott Schreiber on the “Poetics of Space in the Goethezeit,” with contributions on blind spots as projection spaces in Goethe’s Elective Affinities (Tove Holmes); on the topography and topoi of Goethe’s autobiographical childhood (Anthony Mahler); on disorientation and the subterranean in Novalis (John Lyon); on selfhood, sovereignty, and public space in Die italienische Reise, “Das Rochus-Fest zu Bingen,” and Dichtung und Wahrheit (Joseph O’Neil); on Goethe’s theater of anamnesis and the exposure of the temporal subject in Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre (Colin Benert); and on spatial mobilization and tactical displacements in Kleist’s Berliner Abendblätter and the “Tagesbegebenheiten” (Christian Weber).

In addition, there are original contributions on the horror of coming home in Caroline de la Motte Fouqué’s “Der Abtrünnige” (Sara Luly) and on Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi’s Eduard Allwills Papiere (Monika Nenon); on genre and mourning practices in two poems by Karoline von Günderrode (Stephanie Galasso) and on absolute signification and ontological inconsistency in E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Der Sandmann (Gabriel Trop).

We are extremely pleased that the Goethe Yearbook is able to collect so many far-ranging contributions from a diverse group of scholars year after year. Thank you to all who have submitted, thank you to all who read submissions for us. We are now accepting contributions to Vol. 25. As always, we hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars.

Manuscript submissions should reach us by late May, preferably earlier. Submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style and confine themselves to less than 35 pages. For specific questions about scholarly citations, please consult the Yearbook’s style sheet.

Note that the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

Goethe Yearbook 23 (2016)

Articles:
  1. Jane K. Brown, “Building Bridges: Goethe’s Fairy-Tale Aesthetics.” 1-17.
  2. Frederick Amrine, “Goethe as Mystagogue.” 19-39.
  3. Jocelyn Holland, “Observing Neutrality, circa 1800.” 41-57.
  4. Wendy C. Nielsen, “Goethe, Faust, and Motherless Creations.” 59-75.
  5. Lauren Nossett, “Impossible Ideals: Reconciling Virginity and Maternity in Goethe’s Werther.” 77-93.
  6. John H. Smith, “Kant, Calculus, Consciousness, and the Mathematical Infinite in Us.” 95-121.
  7. Eleanor Ter Horst, “The Classical Aesthetics of Schlegel’s Lucinde.” 123-140.

Special Section on Visual Culture in the Goethezeit

  1. Joel B. Lande, “Acquaintance with Color: Prolegomena to a Study of Goethe’s Zur Farbenlehre.” 143-169.
  2. Gabrielle Bersier, “‘Hamiltonian-Hendelian’ Mimoplastics and Tableau of the Underworld: The Visual Aesthetics of Goethe’s 1815 Proserpina Production.” 171-194.
  3. Beate Allert, “J. W. Goethe and C. G. Carus: On the Representation of Nature in Science and Art.” 195-219.
  4. Catriona Macleod, “Brentano’s Remains: Visual and Verbal Bricolage in Gockel, Hinkel und Gackeleia (1838).” 221-243.
  5. Tanvi Solanki, “A Book of Living Paintings: Tableaux Vivants in Goethe’s Die Wahlverwandtschaften (1809).” 245-270.
Book Reviews:
  1. Faust: A Tragedy; Parts One and Two, Fully Revised. Trans. Martin Greenberg. Introduction by W. Daniel Wilson. (Christopher R. Clason). 271-272.
  2. Lotte meine Lotte: Die Briefe von Goethe an Charlotte von Stein, 1776–1786 by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and: Der Briefschreiber Goethe by Albrecht Schöne. (Elizabeth Powers). 273-276.
  3. Goethe: Kunstwerk des Lebens, Biographie by Rüdiger Safranski. (Elizabeth Powers). 276-279.Goethes Erotica und die Weimarer “Zensoren.” by W. Daniel Wilson. (Ehrhard Bahr). 279-281.
  4. Goethe, der Merkantilismus und die Inflation: Zum ökonomischen Wissen und Handeln Goethes und seiner Figuren by Heike Knortz and Beate Laudenberg. (William H. Carter). 281-282.
  5. Wanderers Verstummen, Goethes Schweigen, Fausts Tragödie; oder, Die große Transformation der Welt by Michael Jaeger. (Christopher Chiasson). 282-284.
  6. Mit einer Art von Wut: Goethe in der Revolution by Gustav Seibt. (Waltraud Maierhofer). 284-285.
  7. Goethe’s Allegories of Identity by Jane K. Brown. (Simon Richter). 285-288.
  8. Die Weimarer Klassikerstätten: Vom Kriegsende bis zur Gründung der Nationalen Forschungs- und Gedenkstätten der klassischen deutschen Literatur in Weimar; Ereignisse und Gestalten: Eine Chronik, 1945–1949 ed. by Wilfried Lehrke. (Daniel Wilson). 288-289.
  9. Light in Germany: Scenes from an Unknown Enlightenment by T. J. Reed. (Martha B. Helfer). 290-291.
  10. Necessary Luxuries: Books, Literature, and the Culture of Consumption in Germany, 1770–1815 by Matt Erlin. (Arnd Bohm). 291-292.
  11. Literarische Schriften I, Band 1.1, “Sebaldus Nothanker.” by Friedrich Nicolai, and: Literarische Schriften I, Band 1.2, “Freuden des jungen Werthers”; “Eyn feyner kleiner Almanach”; “Anhang zu Friedrich Schillers Musen-Almanach für das Jahr 1797.” ed. by Hans-Gert Roloff. (James Hardin). 293-296.
  12. Krieg und Frieden im 18. Jahrhundert: Kulturgeschichtliche Studien ed. by Stefanie Stockhorst. (Jonathan Blake Fine). 296-298.
  13. Kostümierung der Geschlechter: Schauspielkunst als Erfindung der Aufklärung by Beate Hochholdinger-Reiterer. (Pascale Lafountain). 298-300.
  14. Empire of Chance: The Napoleonic Wars and the Disorder of Things by Anders Engberg-Pedersen. (Yale Almog). 300-302.
  15. Lesen, Kopieren, Schreiben: Lese- und Exzerpierkunst in der europäischen Literatur des 18. Jahrhunderts ed. by Elisabeth Décultot. (Margaretmary Daley). 302-305.
  16. German Literature as World Literature ed. by Thomas Oliver Beebee. (Mary Bricker). 305-307.
  17. Kant’s Organicism: Epigenesis and the Development of Critical Philosophy by Jennifer Mensch. (Elizabeth Effinger). 307-309.
  18. Geordnete Spontaneität: Lyrische Subjektivität bei Achim von Arnim by Jan Oliver Jost-Fritz. (Christian P. Weber). 309-310.
  19. Fugitive Objects: Sculpture and Literature in the German Nineteenth Century by Catriona MacLeod. (Samuel Frederick). 310-312.
  20. The Tragedy of Fatherhood: King Laius and the Politics of Paternity in the West by Silke-Maria Weineck. (Anita Ludic). 312-314.
  21. Out of Place: German Realism, Displacement, and Modernity by John B. Lyon. (Tove Holmes). 314-316.
  22. Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities by James Turner. (James Hardin). 316-318.
  23. Autonomy after Auschwitz: Adorno, German Idealism, and Modernity by Martin Shuster. (Thomas L. Cooksey). 318-320.

From the Yearbook Editors

As Volume 23 of the Goethe Yearbook is getting ready for publication, we are busy putting together what is looking to be an even larger 24th volume. A special section on “Space and Place in the Goethezeit,” guest-edited by John Lyon and Elliott Schreiber, will collect six essays by eminent and up-and-coming scholars. Eight contributions outside of this focus will bring together scholars from a broad range of disciplinary backgrounds and career stages. The review section, edited for the first time by Sean Franzel, will provide an overview of new publications on Goethe and his age.

We continue to be excited by the way in which the Yearbook manages to reflect the diversity among scholars of the Goethezeit, and the immense spirit of intellectual community that shines through in the reviews. In that spirit, we continue to ask scholars at any stage of their career to get in touch, to submit their work, and to review.

Manuscript submissions should reach us by late May, preferably earlier. Submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style and confine themselves to less than 35 pages. For specific questions about scholarly citations, please consult the Yearbook’s style sheet.

Note that the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

From the Yearbook Editors

Vol. 23 of the Goethe Yearbook is currently being copy-edited and will be on its way to the printer soon. It features a special section on the visual arts with contributions on the visual aesthetics of Goethe’s 1815 Proserpina production by Gabrielle Bersier; on Goethe’s Farbenlehre by Joel Lande; on the relationship between J.W. Goethe and C.G. Carus and their respective views on the representation of nature in art and science by Beate Allert; and on visual and verbal bricolage in Clemens Brentano’s Gockel, Hinkel und Gackeleia. by Catriona MacLeod.

In addition, there are also original contributions on Goethe and ancient mystery religions by Fred Amrine; on Goethe’s fairy-tale aesthetics by Jane Brown; on virginity and maternity in Goethe’s Werther by Lauren Nossett; on motherless creations in Goethe’s Faust by Wendy Nielsen; and on the concept of the mathematical infinite in Kant by John H. Smith.

We would like to use this opportunity to express our gratitude to Stanford University whose generous financial support made it possible to hire a copyeditor and thus has expedited the process considerably. We are now accepting contributions to Vol. 24. We hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars.

As always, the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

 Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

Goethe Yearbook 22 (2015)

Articles:

Special Section on Goethe and Environmentalism edited by Dalia Nassar and Luke Fischer

  1. Luke Fisher and Dalia Nassar, “Introduction: Goethe and Environmentalism.” 3-22.
  2. Kate Rigby, “Art, Nature, and the Poesy of Plants in the Goethezeit: A Biosemiotic Perspective.” 23-44.
  3. Frederick Amrine, “The Music of the Organism: Uexküll, Merleau-Ponty, Zuckerkandl, and Deleuze as Goethean Ecologists in Search of a New Paradigm.” 45-72.
  4. Ryan Feigenbaum, “Toward a Nonanthropocentric Vision of Nature: Goethe’s Discovery of the Intermaxillary Bone.” 73-94.
  5. Jason Groves, “Goethe’s Petrofiction: Reading the Wanderjahre in the Anthropocene.” 95-114.
  6. Heather I. Sullivan, “Nature and the ‘Dark Pastoral’ in Goethe’s Werther.” 115-132.
  7. Gernot Böhme, “Goethe und die moderne Zivilisation.” 133-142.
    ____________________________________
  8. Iris Hennigfeld, “Goethe’s Phenomenological Way of Thinking and the Urphänomen.” 143-168.
  9. Stephanie M. Hilger, “Orientation and Supplementation: Locating the ‘Hermaphrodite’ in the Encyclopédie.” 169-188.
  10. David Hill, “Claudine von Villa Bella and the Publication of ‘Nähe des Geliebten.’ 189-202.
  11. Daniel Purdy, “West-östliche Divan and the ‘Abduction/Seduction of Europe’: World Literature and the Circulation of Culture.” 203-226.
    Helmut J. Schneider, Kunstsammlung und Kunstgeselligkeit: Zu Goethes Sammlungs- und Museumskonzeption zwischen 1798 und 1817.” 227-246.
  12. Inge Stephan, “‘Er hatte einen entschiedenen Hang zur Intrige’: Überlegungen zu J. M. R. Lenz, seiner Rezeption und seinen Werken.” 247-260.
Review Essay:
  1. Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Amtliche Schriften. Teil I, Geheimes Consilium und andere bis zur Italienreise unternommene Aufgabengebiete. Ed. Reinhard Kluge. Frankfurt/Main: Deutscher Klassiker Verlag, 1998. 917 pp., 9 ill. (Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Sämtliche Werke: Briefe, Tagebücher und Gespräche. Ed. Friedmar Apel et al. Frankfurter Ausgabe 26.) Teil II, Aufgabengebiete seit der Rückkehr aus Italien. Ed. Irmtraut und Gerhard Schmid. FA 27. Frankfurt/Main: Deutscher Klassiker Verlag, 1999. 1238 pp., 15 ill. Kommentar zu den Amtlichen Schriften. Vol. 1. Ed. Reinhard Kluge. FA 26K. Berlin: Deutscher Klassiker Verlag, 2011. 667 pp., 11 ill. Kommentar zu den Amtlichen Schriften. Vol. 2. Ed. Gerhard und Irmtraut Schmid. FA 27K. Berlin: Deutscher Klassiker Verlag, 2011. 1425 pp., 9 ill. Register und Verzeichnisse. Ed. Reinhard Kluge, Gerhard Schmid, and Irmtraut Schmid. FA 26/27R (CD-ROM). Berlin: Deutscher Klassiker Verlag, 2011. 355 pp. (W. Daniel Wilson). 261-268.
Book Reviews:
  1. Manfred Wenzel, ed., Goethe Handbuch. Supplemente 2, Naturwissenschaften. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 2012. 851 pp. (Astrida Orle Tantillo). 269.
  2. Heinz Haertl, Hrsg., Die Wahlverwandtschaften: Eine Dokumentation der Wirkung von Goethes Roman, 1808–1832. Reprint der Erstausgabe mit neuen Funden als Anhang und mit Vorwort von Jochen Golz. Schriften der Goethe-Gesellschaft, Bd. 76, hrsg. von Jochen Golz. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2013. 563 S., 17 Abbildungen. (Ehrhard Bahr). 270.
  3. Katharina Mommsen, Goethe und der Alte Fritz. Leipzig: Lehmstedt, 2012. 231 S. (Walter Tschacher). 271.
  4. Christian P. Weber, Die Logik der Lyrik: Goethes Phänomenologie des Geistes in Gedichten. Teil 1, Die Genese des Genies. Freiburg i.Br.: Rombach, 2013. 486 pp. (Martin Baeumel). 273.
  5. Carsten Rohde and Thorsten Valk, eds., Goethes Liebeslyrik: Semantiken der Leidenschaft um 1800. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2013. 404 pp. (Christian P. Weber). 275.
  6. Gabrielle Bersier, Wege des Heilens: Goethes physiologische Autobiographie Dichtung und Wahrheit. Würzburg: Königshausen und Neumann, 2014. 253 pp. (James F. Howell). 279.
  7. Daniel Wilson, Goethe Männer Knaben: Ansichten zur “Homosexualität.” Trans. Angela Steidele. Berlin: Insel, 2012. 503 pp., 41 ills. (Robert D. Tobin). 280.
  8. Pamela Currie, Goethe’s Visual World. Germanic Literatures 3. London: Legenda, 2013. 166 pp. (Walter K. Stewart). 284.
  9. Michael Mandelartz, Goethe, Kleist: Literatur, Politik und Wissenschaft um 1800. Berlin: Erich Schmidt, 2011. 465 pp. (Gabrielle Bersier). 286.
  10. Mattias Pirholt, Metamimesis: Imitation in Goethe’s Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre and Early German Romanticism. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2012. 220 pp. (John B. Lyon). 287.
  11. Jo Tudor, Sound and Sense: Music and Musical Metaphor in the Thought and Writing of Goethe and His Age. Oxford: Peter Lang, 2011. xvi + 515 pp. (Lorraine Byrne Bodley). 289.
  12. Elisabeth Krimmer and Patricia Anne Simpson, eds., Religion, Reason, and Culture in the Age of Goethe. Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2013. 269 pp. (Christopher R. Clason). 291.
  13. Simon Richter and Richard Block, eds., Goethe’s Ghosts: Reading and the Persistence of Literature. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2013. 315 pp., 7 ills. (Lauren J. Brooks). 294.
  14. Eckart Goebel, Beyond Discontent: “Sublimation” from Goethe to Lacan. Trans. James C. Wagner. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2013. xiv + 259 pp. (Thomas L. Cooksey). 296.
  15. Eric Achermann, ed., Johann Christoph Gottsched (1700–1766): Philosophie, Poetik und Wissenschaft. Werkprofile: Philosophen und Literaten des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts. Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 2014. 467 pp. (Seth Berk). 298.
  16. Steven D. Martinson, Projects of Enlightenment: The Work of Gotthold Ephraim Lessing; Cultural, Intercultural, and Transcultural Perspectives. Heidelberg: Synchron, 2013. 286 pp. (Jonathan Blake Fine). 299.
  17. Lisa Marie Anderson, ed., Hamann and the Tradition. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 2012. xiii + 211 pp. (Elizabeth Powers). 301.
  18. Kenneth S. Calhoon, Affecting Grace: Theater, Subject, and the Shakespearean Paradox in German Literature from Lessing to Kleist. Toronto: Toronto UP, 2013. xii + 269 pp., 12 ills. (Jocelyne Kolb). 304.
  19. Elliott Schreiber, The Topography of Modernity: Karl Philipp Moritz and the Space of Autonomy. Signale: Modern German Letters, Cultures, and Thought. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 2012. 179 pp. (Cord-Friedrich Berghahn). 306.
  20. Vicki A. Spencer, Herder’s Political Thought: A Study of Language, Culture, and Community. Toronto: Toronto UP, 2012. xi + 354 pp. (Rachel Zuckert). 310.
  21. Hans Adler and Lynn L. Wolff, eds., Aisthesis und Noesis: Zwei Erkenntisformen vom 18. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart. Munich: Wilhelm Finck, 2013. 202 S. (Beate Allert). 311.
  22. Dalia Nassar, The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795–1804. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014. 360 pp. (Gabriel Trop). 313.
  23. Peter Goßens, Weltliteratur: Modelle transnationaler Literaturwahrnehmung im 19. Jahrhundert. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 2011. xiii + 457 pp. (Elizabeth Powers). 316.
  24. John Walker, ed., The Present Word: Culture, Society and the Site of Literature; Essays in Honour of Nicholas Boyle. London: Legenda, for Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Publishing, 2013. xii + 204 pp. (Arnd Bohm). 318.

From the Yearbook Editors

We are still looking for original contributions to volume 23 and would like to invite submissions on all aspects of eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century German literature and culture. We are particularly interested in articles written by advanced graduate students and assistant professors, and would like to use this opportunity to encourage them to contact us about potential publications.

In addition to our general section, we are planning a special section on “Goethe and the Visual Arts” and welcome contributions on drawings, painting, tableau vivant, sculpture, printmaking, design, and architecture in the long eighteenth century. We are also interested in critical readings of films about Goethe and his contemporaries as well as filmic adaptations of eighteenth-century works.

Submissions should reach us by late May, preferably earlier. Manuscript submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style and confine themselves to less than 35 pages. For specific questions about scholarly citations, please consult the Yearbook’s style sheet.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

 Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

From the Yearbook Editors

Vol. 22 of the Goethe Yearbook is currently being copy-edited and will be on its way to the printer soon. It features a special section on Environmentalism edited by Dalia Nassar and Luke Fischer with contributions on: the metaphor of music in Goethe’s scientific work and its influence on Gilles Deleuze, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jakob von Uexküll and Viktor Zuckerkandl (Frederick Amrine); Goethe’s conceptualization of modern civilization in Faust (Gernot Böhme); a non-anthropocentric vision of nature in Goethe’s writings on the intermaxillary bone (Ryan Feigenbaum); Goethe’s geopoetics of granite (Jason Groves); the historical antecedents of biosemiotics in Goethe’s “Die Metamorphose der Pflanzen” (Cate Rigby); and on the concept of the ‘Dark Pastoral’ in Goethe’s Werther (Heather I. Sullivan).

In addition, there are also original contributions on Goethe as a spiritual predecessor of the phenomenological movement (Iris Hennigfeld); on concepts of the “hermaphrodite” in contributions to the Encyclopédie by Louis de Jaucourt and Albrecht von Haller (Stephanie Hilger); on Goethe’s poem “Nähe des Geliebten” (David Hill); on the link between commerce and culture, that is, between the consumption of Asian luxury products and the reading of foreign literature in Goethe’s West-östlicher Divan (Daniel Purdy); on Goethe’s thoughts on collecting and museums (Helmut Schneider); and on the role and representation of intrigues in the works of J.M.R. Lenz (Inge Stephan).

We would like to use this opportunity to express our gratitude to Stanford University whose generous financial support made it possible to hire a copyeditor and thus has expedited the process considerably. We are now accepting contributions to Vol. 23. We hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars.

As always, the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

From the Yearbook Editors

Volume 21 of the Goethe Yearbook is well on its way. It contains eleven original articles that reflect the diversity of our society: there are contributions by several generations of German scholars, including pieces by David Wellbery and Katharina Mommsen, as well as innovative articles on women writers (Unger, Günderode) and several fascinating interdisciplinary pieces, ranging from an analysis of illustrations of Goethe’s works to a discussion of contemporary psychological and medical theories of ill humor in relation to Goethe’s Werther and an economic reading of Goethe’s Faust. In addition, the volume features sophisticated theoretical approaches to Goethe’s works, including an article on concepts of space in Alexis und Dora and one on notions of sacrifice in Faust. Finally, there is a study of Goethe reception around 1900 and a discussion of Albrecht von Haller’s works. We would like to use this opportunity to express our gratitude to Stanford University whose generous financial support made it possible to hire a copyeditor and thus has expedited the process considerably.

We are delighted to announce that volume 22 of the Goethe Yearbook will feature a special section on Goethe and ecocriticism. The editors of this section, Dalia Nassar and Luke Fisher, invite contributions on environmental aesthetics, ethics, and philosophy, ecopoetics, Goethe’s legacy in the environmental movement, and environmental activism. Find the Call for Papers below. The deadline is March 31, 2014. Please note that, in addition to this special section, we will continue to publish contributions on all aspects of Goethezeit literature and culture in the next yearbook. We hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars. Please direct all correspondence to Adrian Daub at daub@stanford.edu and Elisabeth Krimmer at emkrimmer@ucdavis.edu. Manuscript submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style and confine themselves to less than 35 pages. For specific questions about scholarly citations, please consult the Yearbook’s style sheet.

As always, the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

CFP: 2014 Goethe Yearbook

CFP for a Special Section of the 2014 Goethe Yearbook
Goethe and Environmentalism
Guest Editors: Dalia Nassar and Luke Fischer

Over the past few decades, new movements have emerged in literary studies and philosophy (ecocriticism, ecopoetics, environmental philosophy etc.) that are concerned with the relationship between humanity and the natural environment, and the cultural dimension of the environmental crisis. While much attention has been given to the environmental legacy of romanticism, only a small amount of scholarship has focused on Goethe. In light of the central significance of nature in Goethe’s literary, theoretical and scientific texts, it could be argued that Goethe was a major forerunner of the environmental movement and that his ideas continue to be relevant in the present context. The aim of this special section of the Goethe Yearbook is to bring together various perspectives on Goethe’s relevance for environmental thought and, more specifically, to shed light on the environmental significance of Goethe’s legacy and on the potential of his ideas to contribute to contemporary debates in the environmental humanities. We welcome the submission of articles on Goethe’s significance for the following topics:

  • Environmental aesthetics
  • Ecocriticism
  • Ecopoetics
  • Environmental philosophy
  • Environmental ethics
  • Environmental management
  • Goethe’s legacy in the environmental movement
  • Environmental activism

Submission deadline: March 31, 2014

Please send submissions to the guest editors at: dalia.nassar@sydney.edu.au and lukefisch@gmail.com.

Please note that, in addition to this special section, we will continue to publish contributions on all aspects of Goethezeit literature and culture in the next yearbook. We hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis