Category Archives: Goethe Yearbook

From the Yearbook Editors

We are still looking for original contributions to volume 23 and would like to invite submissions on all aspects of eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century German literature and culture. We are particularly interested in articles written by advanced graduate students and assistant professors, and would like to use this opportunity to encourage them to contact us about potential publications.

In addition to our general section, we are planning a special section on “Goethe and the Visual Arts” and welcome contributions on drawings, painting, tableau vivant, sculpture, printmaking, design, and architecture in the long eighteenth century. We are also interested in critical readings of films about Goethe and his contemporaries as well as filmic adaptations of eighteenth-century works.

Submissions should reach us by late May, preferably earlier. Manuscript submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style and confine themselves to less than 35 pages. For specific questions about scholarly citations, please consult the Yearbook’s style sheet.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

 Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

From the Yearbook Editors

Vol. 22 of the Goethe Yearbook is currently being copy-edited and will be on its way to the printer soon. It features a special section on Environmentalism edited by Dalia Nassar and Luke Fischer with contributions on: the metaphor of music in Goethe’s scientific work and its influence on Gilles Deleuze, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jakob von Uexküll and Viktor Zuckerkandl (Frederick Amrine); Goethe’s conceptualization of modern civilization in Faust (Gernot Böhme); a non-anthropocentric vision of nature in Goethe’s writings on the intermaxillary bone (Ryan Feigenbaum); Goethe’s geopoetics of granite (Jason Groves); the historical antecedents of biosemiotics in Goethe’s “Die Metamorphose der Pflanzen” (Cate Rigby); and on the concept of the ‘Dark Pastoral’ in Goethe’s Werther (Heather I. Sullivan).

In addition, there are also original contributions on Goethe as a spiritual predecessor of the phenomenological movement (Iris Hennigfeld); on concepts of the “hermaphrodite” in contributions to the Encyclopédie by Louis de Jaucourt and Albrecht von Haller (Stephanie Hilger); on Goethe’s poem “Nähe des Geliebten” (David Hill); on the link between commerce and culture, that is, between the consumption of Asian luxury products and the reading of foreign literature in Goethe’s West-östlicher Divan (Daniel Purdy); on Goethe’s thoughts on collecting and museums (Helmut Schneider); and on the role and representation of intrigues in the works of J.M.R. Lenz (Inge Stephan).

We would like to use this opportunity to express our gratitude to Stanford University whose generous financial support made it possible to hire a copyeditor and thus has expedited the process considerably. We are now accepting contributions to Vol. 23. We hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars.

As always, the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

From the Yearbook Editors

Volume 21 of the Goethe Yearbook is well on its way. It contains eleven original articles that reflect the diversity of our society: there are contributions by several generations of German scholars, including pieces by David Wellbery and Katharina Mommsen, as well as innovative articles on women writers (Unger, Günderode) and several fascinating interdisciplinary pieces, ranging from an analysis of illustrations of Goethe’s works to a discussion of contemporary psychological and medical theories of ill humor in relation to Goethe’s Werther and an economic reading of Goethe’s Faust. In addition, the volume features sophisticated theoretical approaches to Goethe’s works, including an article on concepts of space in Alexis und Dora and one on notions of sacrifice in Faust. Finally, there is a study of Goethe reception around 1900 and a discussion of Albrecht von Haller’s works. We would like to use this opportunity to express our gratitude to Stanford University whose generous financial support made it possible to hire a copyeditor and thus has expedited the process considerably.

We are delighted to announce that volume 22 of the Goethe Yearbook will feature a special section on Goethe and ecocriticism. The editors of this section, Dalia Nassar and Luke Fisher, invite contributions on environmental aesthetics, ethics, and philosophy, ecopoetics, Goethe’s legacy in the environmental movement, and environmental activism. Find the Call for Papers below. The deadline is March 31, 2014. Please note that, in addition to this special section, we will continue to publish contributions on all aspects of Goethezeit literature and culture in the next yearbook. We hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars. Please direct all correspondence to Adrian Daub at daub@stanford.edu and Elisabeth Krimmer at emkrimmer@ucdavis.edu. Manuscript submissions should follow the Chicago Manual of Style and confine themselves to less than 35 pages. For specific questions about scholarly citations, please consult the Yearbook’s style sheet.

As always, the entire run of back issues is available on Project MUSE.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis

CFP: 2014 Goethe Yearbook

CFP for a Special Section of the 2014 Goethe Yearbook
Goethe and Environmentalism
Guest Editors: Dalia Nassar and Luke Fischer

Over the past few decades, new movements have emerged in literary studies and philosophy (ecocriticism, ecopoetics, environmental philosophy etc.) that are concerned with the relationship between humanity and the natural environment, and the cultural dimension of the environmental crisis. While much attention has been given to the environmental legacy of romanticism, only a small amount of scholarship has focused on Goethe. In light of the central significance of nature in Goethe’s literary, theoretical and scientific texts, it could be argued that Goethe was a major forerunner of the environmental movement and that his ideas continue to be relevant in the present context. The aim of this special section of the Goethe Yearbook is to bring together various perspectives on Goethe’s relevance for environmental thought and, more specifically, to shed light on the environmental significance of Goethe’s legacy and on the potential of his ideas to contribute to contemporary debates in the environmental humanities. We welcome the submission of articles on Goethe’s significance for the following topics:

  • Environmental aesthetics
  • Ecocriticism
  • Ecopoetics
  • Environmental philosophy
  • Environmental ethics
  • Environmental management
  • Goethe’s legacy in the environmental movement
  • Environmental activism

Submission deadline: March 31, 2014

Please send submissions to the guest editors at: dalia.nassar@sydney.edu.au and lukefisch@gmail.com.

Please note that, in addition to this special section, we will continue to publish contributions on all aspects of Goethezeit literature and culture in the next yearbook. We hope to hear from many of you and particularly welcome contributions by younger scholars.

Adrian Daub
Stanford University

Elisabeth Krimmer
University of California at Davis